Settler Colonialism in Canada

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<h2>Canadian Settler Colonialism: Reliving the Past, Opening New Paths, Graduate Student Symposium and Open Access Publication. To take place virtually – October 14, 2022</h2>
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<p><em><strong>The questions. </strong></em>What does contemporary settler colonialism look like in Canada, and what reconciliatory and decolonial strategies exist to resist and counter its effects? What historical processes, what policies have led to the current moment, and how are these processes and policies present today under new guises? </p>
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<p><strong><em>The context. </em></strong>Canada is a long-established settler colonial nation state; and yet very few Canadians understand what this means historically or for present-day reconciliatory and decolonial efforts. we could characterize settler colonial Canada as a nation state structured to exploit, marginalize, and assimilate Indigenous peoples (Green 1995), and to exterminate Indigenous specific populations, resource use, inherent rights, and overall livelihoods (Coulthard 2014). Decolonization is the dismantling of any (imperial or settler) colonial inequities and the resurgence of Indigenous-centred political, legal, and social constructs. Increasingly, critiques of Canada’s decolonial and reconciliatory frameworks demonstrate inadequacies in these attempts. Much of this is because settler colonialism is insidious, difficult to detect and dismantle, and relatively under-studied in Canada. Additionally, reconciliation and decolonization jeopardize the very survival of the settler colonial enterprise, which is premised on the elimination of Indigenous peoples (or, at a minimum, Indigenous difference). This project therefore focuses on responses from Indigenous peoples, racialized minorities, and settlers to understand in order to dismantle the insidious nature of oppression unique to settler colonialism.</p>
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<p><br><strong><em>The project. </em></strong>This call for contributions aims to collect contributions toward a collective effort to chart how the history of settler colonialism is carried and lived in the present, and what acts of resistance and resurgence are being undertaken to unmake it. Combining academic disciplines and lived experience, its result will be an Open Educational Resource, free of use, made available online to everyone without registration through the University of Regina Open Textbooks program (https://opentextbooks.uregina.ca/).</p>
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<p><br>This collection, focusing primarily on settler colonialism in Canada (with some comparative examples from other western settler states), will be a timely contribution to the fields of Indigenous studies, race studies, Canadian politics, and settler colonial studies. We have structured the wider project around three general perspectives: Indigenous Peoples, Multicultural/Racialized Settlers, and Settlers of European background. While the collection will focus on Canada as a settler state, we acknowledge and will recognize that borders are imposed and porous and that the territories, places, and personal and collective trajectories affected by settler colonialism are not contained in “Canada.”</p>
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<p>Please contact <a href="mailto:Jerome.Melancon@uregina.ca" data-type="mailto" data-id="mailto:Jerome.Melancon@uregina.ca">Dr Jérôme Melançon</a> (University of Regina) for further details and to submit your abstract </p>
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Canadian Settler Colonialism: Reliving the Past, Opening New Paths, Graduate Student Symposium and Open Access Publication. To take place virtually – October 14, 2022

The questions. What does contemporary settler colonialism look like in Canada, and what reconciliatory and decolonial strategies exist to resist and counter its effects? What historical processes, what policies have led to the current moment, and how are these processes and policies present today under new guises?

The context. Canada is a long-established settler colonial nation state; and yet very few Canadians understand what this means historically or for present-day reconciliatory and decolonial efforts. we could characterize settler colonial Canada as a nation state structured to exploit, marginalize, and assimilate Indigenous peoples (Green 1995), and to exterminate Indigenous specific populations, resource use, inherent rights, and overall livelihoods (Coulthard 2014). Decolonization is the dismantling of any (imperial or settler) colonial inequities and the resurgence of Indigenous-centred political, legal, and social constructs. Increasingly, critiques of Canada’s decolonial and reconciliatory frameworks demonstrate inadequacies in these attempts. Much of this is because settler colonialism is insidious, difficult to detect and dismantle, and relatively under-studied in Canada. Additionally, reconciliation and decolonization jeopardize the very survival of the settler colonial enterprise, which is premised on the elimination of Indigenous peoples (or, at a minimum, Indigenous difference). This project therefore focuses on responses from Indigenous peoples, racialized minorities, and settlers to understand in order to dismantle the insidious nature of oppression unique to settler colonialism.


The project. This call for contributions aims to collect contributions toward a collective effort to chart how the history of settler colonialism is carried and lived in the present, and what acts of resistance and resurgence are being undertaken to unmake it. Combining academic disciplines and lived experience, its result will be an Open Educational Resource, free of use, made available online to everyone without registration through the University of Regina Open Textbooks program (https://opentextbooks.uregina.ca/).


This collection, focusing primarily on settler colonialism in Canada (with some comparative examples from other western settler states), will be a timely contribution to the fields of Indigenous studies, race studies, Canadian politics, and settler colonial studies. We have structured the wider project around three general perspectives: Indigenous Peoples, Multicultural/Racialized Settlers, and Settlers of European background. While the collection will focus on Canada as a settler state, we acknowledge and will recognize that borders are imposed and porous and that the territories, places, and personal and collective trajectories affected by settler colonialism are not contained in “Canada.”

Please contact Dr Jérôme Melançon (University of Regina) for further details and to submit your abstract